16 Species of Hummingbirds in Florida (with Pictures)


Hummingbirds in Florida

There are as many as 338 species of hummingbirds known to man. Of these, 16 species have been spotted in Florida. One species even has its home in Florida. It is found in the state throughout the year. This species does not migrate. Two other hummingbird species visit Florida as a part of their migratory pattern each year. They may spend a season in the state.

Thirteen other species of the hummingbird have been spotted in Florida outside their typical geographical location. Courtesy of their nature, they are known as rare or vagrant hummingbirds in Florida. Together, these 16 species of hummingbirds make Florida an amazing place for birdwatchers waiting to sight this bird.

I studied the range of maps and information provided by reliable and authoritative sources like the University of Florida’s edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw059Opens in a new tab. and allaboutbirds.org. Following meticulous research on these platforms, I have curated a list of the 16 species of hummingbirds that can be spotted in the sunshine state of Florida.

Read ahead to find the size, weight, and short descriptions of the year-round and migrating hummingbird species in Florida. Following this, you will find a list of the vagrant species that have been spotted in the state on occasion. Have fun!

 

Common Hummingbirds Found in Florida

 

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

Length – 2.8 – 3.5 in
Weight – 0.1 – 0.2 oz
Wingspan – 3.1 – 4.3 in

Ruby-throated hummingbirds are commonly spotted in Southern Florida. They reside here as native birds throughout the year. They are also spotted in huge numbers between early March and late October.

The male ruby-throated hummingbirds arrive first in Florida and eventually make their way to South America. The female hummingbirds of this species follow the male birds on their migratory path.

These birds migrate during the darker hours of the night. This is also called the red-eye flight. Ruby-throated hummingbirdsOpens in a new tab. can be spotted around open spaces like parks and backyards in Florida.

 

Black-Chinned Hummingbird

Black-Chinned Hummingbird

Length – 3.5 in
Weight – 0.1-0.2 oz
Wingspan – 4.3 in

Black-chinned hummingbirds are sighted in Florida during the winter months. They remain here for a short duration only. These birds begin migrating in early September from Canada and arrive in Florida in November.

They soon leave for Mexico, where they spend the late winter season. They breed largely in open spaces. Hence, they can be spotted around parks, woodlands, and gardens around Florida.

The males have a purple gorget while females have a rounded tail. However, the male black-chinned hummingbird may just look black to the eye when sighted. It is because of this purple color on their throat is only minimal.

 

Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird

Length – 2.8 – 3.5 in
Weight – 0.10 – 0.14 oz
Wingspan – 4.3 in

The Rufous hummingbird makes the longest migration compared to any other bird species in the world. They migrate from Mexico to as far north as Alaska. You will find this bird in the Everglades National Park in Southern Florida.

During the winter months, they can be sighted along the Gulf Coast of Florida. These hummingbirds are known to be very territorial. There have been cases where they have attacked squirrels that approach their nests.

The male Rufous hummingbirds are easy to spot due to their orange, iridescent gorget that will stand out. The female hummingbirds of this species are green and white, with some orange feathers on their necks.

 

Rare Hummingbirds in Florida

These 13 hummingbirds do not have a range in Florida. However, they can be sighted in the state occasionally.

Broad-Tailed Hummingbird

Broad-Tailed Hummingbird

Length – 3.1 – 3.5 in
Weight – 0.1 – 0.2 oz
Wingspan – 5.25 in

The broad-tailed hummingbird has been sighted in the northwestern area of the state in Florida Panhandle. It is usually found here during fall and winter.

These birds have a migrant population as well as a non-migrant one. The migrant ones move north during the year and return to Mexico for the winters and join the non-migrant broad-tailed hummingbirds.

You can spot both the male and female broad-tailed hummingbirds through their pale underbellies and green topside. The male among these has a gorget colored in iridescent ruby-red. You can find them in the understory of mature woodlands like oak and pine groves.

 

Allen’s Hummingbird

Allen’s Hummingbird

Length – 3.5 in
Weight – 0.1 – 0.1 oz
Wingspan – 4.3 in

Most of Allen’s Hummingbirds migrate north upwards from Mexico. They are seen largely in Texas and on the West Coast. A few of these migrate into the east and enter Florida as rare migrants.

They can be found in dry vegetation with dense thorny bushes and shrubs and open woodlands. You will also find them in riparian wetlands. They look very similar to the Rufous hummingbird; those two are almost indistinguishable.

The male Allen’s Hummingbird has a gorget that is colored in iridescent orange-red. The female hummingbirds do not have this gorget. Both have a greenback and forehead.

 

Anna’s Hummingbird

Anna’s Hummingbird

Length – 3.9 – 4.3 in
Weight – 0.1- 0.2 oz
Wingspan – 4.7 in

The Anna’s Hummingbird is rarely sighted, mostly on Florida’s western coast. It can be found at any time of the year. The male hummingbirds have an iridescent red crown. The females, on the other hand, have a pale green color.

These birds are the only hummingbirds in North America to have this bright red crown. This will let you spot them easily. They also tend to sing during courtship.

You can identify this through a high-pitched, squeaky sound. You will also find a pale white line over their eye. With this, you can recognize Anna’s hummingbird as you sight one.

 

Bahama Woodstars Hummingbird

Bahama Woodstars Hummingbird

Length – 3 – 4 in
Weight – 0.09 – 0.20 oz
Wingspan – 3.94 – 5.12 in

The Bahama Woodstars hummingbird is spotted extremely rarely in Florida. It is a Caribbean hummingbird that mostly does not migrate. When spotted, they may be seen in south-eastern Florida.

During the breeding season, this vagrant bird will have a brilliant violet-red gorget. However, they shed this color after the breeding season. Both male and female hummingbirds of this species have a green body with brown wings.

 

Buff-Bellied Hummingbird

Buff-Bellied Hummingbird

Length – 3.9 – 4.3 in
Weight – 0.1 oz
Wingspan – 5.75 in

These Buff-bellied hummingbirds may be seen around West Florida or the Florida PanhandleOpens in a new tab.. However, they are rarely spotted. They have also been sighted in Miami-Dade County in Southern Florida.

The male hummingbirds have a grey-turquoise gorget tinged in blue. They have a golden-brown tail and a brilliant metallic olive green colored back. You can spot the female Buff-bellied hummingbirds by their duller body.

You will find them in areas with deciduous trees and large shrubs as they nest in these plants.

 

Broad-Billed Hummingbird

Broad-Billed Hummingbird

Length – 3 – 3.9 in
Weight – 0.10 – 0.14 oz
Wingspan – 5.1 in

These Broad-Billed hummingbirds have a migratory path that moves south during the fall and winter seasons. They are only sighted in Florida as vagrant birds.

They have been previously sighted in the Florida peninsula. They may have strayed here from their migratory path to Mexico.

The male Broad-billed hummingbirds have a grey-green gorget. This extends to its shoulder like a short cape. The completely dark bill of the female hummingbirds and the white line above their eyes help tell them apart from the males.

They construct their nests with grass fibers and don’t usually decorate them with any lichens. Spider webs add glue to the nest and keep them together.

 

Antillean Crested Hummingbird

Antillean Crested Hummingbird

Length – 3.14 – 3.7 in
Weight – 0.12 – 0.14 oz
Wingspan – 5 in

The Antillean Crested Hummingbird is sighted extremely rarely in the south-eastern part of Florida. They are a native hummingbird of the Caribbean.

The male Antillean Crested hummingbird is known for its feathered head that resembles a Mohawk. This is grey in color. Some of these birds have an olive-green back that may look completely black at times.

These birds are not known to be very creative. During the breeding season, they are not as playful as other species of hummingbirds can be.

 

White-Eared Hummingbird

White-Eared Hummingbird

Length – 3.4 in
Weight – 0.1 oz
Wingspan – 4 – 5 in

The graceful White-Eared hummingbird is largely found in Mexico and Nicaragua. In Florida, they have been sighted very rarely during November.

You can spot a make White-Eared hummingbird by the tints and shades of green found on its back. Some are dull green, and the others are iridescent and brilliant. When dark, this green may appear black.

They are found in areas with coniferous forests where trees like pine-oak are found in abundance. The cold winters, warmer summers, and consistent rainfall make these forests ideal for the White-Eared hummingbird.

 

Green-Violetears Hummingbird

Green-Violetears Hummingbird

Length – 3.8 – 4.7 in
Weight – 0.17 – 0.20 oz
Wingspan – 4.7 in

This beautiful hummingbird is largely found in Mexico and Central America. They enjoy the tropical deciduous forests in these areas.

The vagrant hummingbirds may migrate north from tropical South America. This is how these birds have been sighted in Florida. However, such sighting is extremely rare.

To identify these Green-Violetears hummingbirds, notice the brilliant green and violet patches on their ears. These will also extend down to their necks. They also have a blue-green tail with bronze feathers in the center.
They can be found around flowering trees.

 

Green-Breasted Mango Hummingbird

Green-Breasted Mango Hummingbird

Length – 4.3 – 4.7 in
Weight – 0.2 oz
Wingspan – 3 – 5 in

These Green-breasted Mango hummingbirds are natives of Mexico. As they migrate, they move south to Central America and Panama.

If they are found in Florida, they are there as accidental vagrants. Hence, sighting one is an extremely rare affair.
If you do spot one, you can identify a Green-Breasted Mango hummingbird by its sapphire gorget that extends down to its neck. This is seen on the male bird that also has a turquoise crown.

The tail is especially colorful, ranging from purple to magenta as it fans out. They also have thick black beaks. The female birds have a dull dark green back and black wings.

 

Blue-Throated Hummingbird

Blue-Throated Hummingbird

Length – 4.3 – 4.7 in
Weight – 0.3 oz
Wingspan – 2.3 – 3.1 in

Also called the Blue-Throated Mountain Gem, these hummingbirds are relatively large. They are extremely rare in Florida. If found, they are vagrant birds native to Mexico.

You can identify the male birds by their brilliant iridescent blue gorget. They also have white stripes over both their eyes. The ends of their tails are white, while the rest of the body is a shade of brown.

Their shoulders are a grey-green. It won’t be surprising if you find them in a residential building. They are mountainous birds who generally nest on dry surfaces like rock overhangs. They also return to their nests year after year.

 

Costa’s Hummingbird

Costa’s Hummingbird

Length – 3 – 3.5 in
Weight – 0.1 oz
Wingspan – 4.3 in

If you spot a costa’s hummingbird in Florida, it is an extremely rare sighting. They are largely sighted in the deserts of Mexico and the southern United States. They are also coastal birds and are only seen inland during the breeding season.

You can identify a male Costa’s hummingbird by the reddish-purple gorget and cap. You will also find that their backs and flanks are green. The female counterpart has a light greyish underbelly and is not as vibrant in color.
You will find their nests over cacti as they prefer dry and scarce vegetation.

 

Rivoli’s Hummingbird

Rivoli’s Hummingbird

Length – 4.3 – 5.5 in
Weight – 0.21 – 0.35 oz
Wingspan – 7.1 in

These birds are largely spotted in western parts of the United States, including New Mexico and Arizona. They enter Florida as vagrant birds and are sighted in the state very rarely.

The males can be identified by their green gorget and violet crown. The female Rivoli’s hummingbirds are duller in color. However, their color is evident only in bright sunlight.

They prefer trees such as pine and fir that grow in evergreen coniferous forests. They nest in those trees that are close to creeks and streams.

 

When can you find hummingbirds arriving in Florida?

Hummingbirds arrive in Florida in early March during the spring season. The male hummingbirds arrive first and are also the first to leave. The female and juvenile birds follow suit. With your feeders ready, you can be prepared to sight some colorful hummingbirds!

 

Endnotes

Hummingbirds come in a range of brilliant colors. In Florida, you will sight the Ruby-Throated hummingbird most often as they are native to the state. The Black-Chinned and Rufous hummingbirds migrate to Florida and may also be sighted. Keep an eye out for 13 other species of vagrant hummingbirds that may have made their way to the sunshine state!